Passing your Basic Theory Test is the first step towards attaining your driver’s licence. It is a fundamental and mandatory component of learning how to drive. You will only be able to apply for a Provisional Driving License (PDL) and start on your practical driving lessons with your driving school or private driving instructor after passing your Basic Theory Test. This article serves as a comprehensive guide to everything you need to know to register and pass your Basic Theory Test.


Procedure for Basic Theory Test.

1. Register at a driving school.
There are three driving schools in Singapore: the Singapore Safety Driving Centre (SSDC) at 2 Woodlands Industrial Park E4, ComfortDelGro Driving Centre (CDC) at Ubi Ave 4 and Bukit Batok Driving Centre (BBDC) at Bukit Batok West Avenue 5. Be sure to bring along your NRIC or passport and a debit or credit card to pay the registration fees. You will be required to pay a registration fee of $6.50 for the Basic Theory Test and $6.50 for the Final Theory Test. While you are not required to pay all your fees on the day you register, it will be more convenient for you to do so since most of the driving schools are located in somewhat remote locations. Paying your fees upfront will reduce the number of trips you will have to make to the school and help you to save time since the waiting line at driving centres can get very long during certain hours and days of the week. Should you decide that you want to enrol as a student in the school for your practical lessons, you may wish to pay the enrolment fees ($96.30) upfront while you are registering as well.

2. Get your Basic Theory of Driving booklet.
You can choose to get either a physical book that will be available at numerous bookstores nationwide or an Ebook from an online store. If you enrol as a student in the driving centre, the theory books may be provided for you by the school, so be sure to check with them before purchasing your book so that you don’t spend money unnecessarily. Always check that you’re buying the latest edition of the book since there might have been changes to the highway code not included in the previous version that may be important.

3. Go for your lessons.
If you’ve registered yourself as a driving school student, your designated driving school will conduct classroom lessons on the driving theory that you can attend. You will also have the option of learning through e-lessons uploaded by the school. Try your best not to miss any lessons as your instructors are trained to teach you the main points and may also give you tips on how to score better during the test. Private candidates will have to ensure that they take time out of their schedule to self-study the syllabus. You will be able to learn more effectively if you regularly refresh your memory by actively taking note of road signs whenever you’re out on the streets. Keep testing yourself if you really know what each and every sign is supposed to mean. Once you can safely say that you understand all the signs you come across, you are ready to take the test.

4. Look through test questions.
Both driving school test candidates, as well as private candidates, are able to register for mock tests prepared by the school in order to prepare for the exam. If you don’t feel like forking out the fees for a mock test, you can choose to seek out the tonnes of free resources available online for you to prepare yourself for the test. With just a few taps on your keyboard and clicks on your mouse, you will be able to find sites that provide hundreds of free test questions similar to real test questions. As long as you have the discipline to pace yourself properly, you should be able to pass with limited difficulty. You should try to look through as many test questions as possible to prepare yourself for any unexpected questions you might face during the test.

5. Register for your Basic Theory Test.
You will be required to register separately for your Basic Theory Test on the driving centre website if you did not do so when you first went down to the driving centre to register yourself. Don’t take your own sweet time; the closest date available for you to book a slot is usually at least a month away from the day that you register. Because of this long waiting time, you don’t have to wait until you are a hundred per cent prepared before registering. Chances are that if you do that, you’ll forget everything you’ve learnt by the time your test date arrives. Book a slot before you’re fully prepared so that your memory will be at its peak during the day of the test. If you work better under pressure, you may even want to consider booking a slot the very day you register in the driving school so that you will be forced to make time to study whether you want to or not.

6. Go for the test.
You will be given a total of 50 minutes to complete your Basic Theory Test. The passing mark is 90%, and you will need to answer a total of 50 questions, which means you will need to get at least 45 questions correct out of 50. This figure may seem daunting at first glance, but rest assured, you have nothing to worry about if you’ve done sufficient preparation. Some people do not spend enough time and effort preparing for their Basic Theory Test because they feel like it’s no big deal to retake it since it’s relatively cheap ($6.50). However, remember that if you fail, not only will you be wasting that $6.50, you will also be wasting another entire month because you will need to book your test and wait all over again. Do it once, do it right, and you won’t have to waste more of your precious time and money.


How to perform your best during the BTT.

1. Arrive early.
For any and all tests, it’s always a good idea to show up earlier than you have to. The extra time you spend outside the exam venue waiting for the test to begin will help you to calm your nerves and perform your best. You can also use that time to do some last minute revision as well as run through some pointers in your head so that you don’t have to spend as much time pondering over the questions during the test.

2. Bring along your BTT booklet.
While some people may have their reservations about the usefulness of this tip because they feel that last minute studying won’t do you any good, having your booklet with you will provide you with some peace of mind in case you have a momentary mental block. It’s true that if you choose not to study till an hour before the test, you’re unlikely to pass. But even the most prepared person can panic before a test, and it helps to have in your hands something to affirm you and calm you down.

3. Don’t rush.
You have 50 minutes to complete 50 questions, which means you can only afford to spend a maximum of one minute on one question. When you look at it that way, it creates the illusion of needing to rush through the questions so that you can finish them on time. However, trust me when I say that 50 minutes for 50 multiple-choice questions is more than enough. Chances are you’ll even have ample time to check your answers at the end of the test. Don’t rush, because that’s when you’ll end up making the most mistakes.

4. Check your answers.
After you finish the test, don’t be in a hurry to submit it and leave. Nobody is going to give you a prize for being the first one to leave the test venue. Always, always, always make sure that you double check your answers. Ensure that you haven’t misread any questions or left them blank. Even if you don’t know what the answer is, just pick the one that sounds like the safest option. You won’t be penalised for any wrong answers, so you might as well try your luck and see if you can manage to get it right. If you have enough time, go back to the start and mentally redo every question from scratch. Remember that once you hit ‘submit’, there’s no more turning back.


Conclusion.
It is imperative that you prepare well for your test before attempting it so that you don’t waste time having to retake it when you could have passed the first-time round if you had put in enough effort to study. The Basic Theory Test ensures that all potential future drivers are aware of the road signs as well as necessary safety precautions that you need to take when you are on the road. It may be viewed as troublesome to us as students, but it is undoubtedly a crucial part of a driver’s education.